• Home

City of Binghamton Continues to Fight Blight

Posted: Updated:
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. -

Mayor Richard C. David Thursday announced the City of Binghamton has condemned two properties: 25 Charlotte St. and 51 The Circuit St.

“City Hall will use every resource available to fight blight and protect residents from unhealthy living conditions,” said Mayor David. “Sometimes when families have nowhere left to turn, they live in unsafe housing because it’s affordable. We should have a higher standard of living in Binghamton. Condemning properties is an effective way address buildings with chronic problems, hold landlords accountable, ensure resident safety and improve quality of life in neighborhoods.”

25 Charlotte St. was found to be unfit for human habitation due to:

  •          Clogged sewer line causing sewage overflow in a second floor unit, pouring onto the floor and dripping through to a first floor apartment.
  •          Broken sewer main flooding the basement with sewage.
  •          Storage of garbage outside the building and on a second-floor porch, resulting in a cockroach infestation.
  •          Lack of fire and carbon monoxide detectors and unsafe electrical wiring.

A decision from the City’s Office of Corporation Counsel ordered the building be vacated and remain uninhabited until these issues are resolved and it passes a code compliance inspection. 25 Charlotte St. “is so damaged, decayed, dilapidated, unsanitary, unsafe, or vermin infested that it creates a serious hazard to the health or safety of the occupants or the public,” according to the decision.

51 The Circuit St. was found to be unfit for human habitation due to:

  •          Clogged/broken sewer line causing a raw sewage leak in the basement.
  •          Garbage storage inside and outside the building, providing harborage for rodents and insects.
  •          Chipmunk infestation.
  •          Dilapidated structural condition of the front porch.
  •          Lack of working smoke detectors.

A decision from the City’s Office of Corporation Counsel ordered the building be vacated and remain uninhabited until these issues are resolved and it passes a code compliance inspection. “The building is serviced by a damaged, decayed, dilapidated sewer/water system that is unsanitary and unsafe and poses a hazard to the health or safety of the occupants,” according to the decision.

Once the Office of Code Enforcement receives a complaint, a code enforcement officer visits the property for an inspection. If the property is not code compliant, a notice of violation is sent to the property owner and a re-inspection is scheduled. Upon re-inspection, if the property owner has failed to fix the violations, a criminal summons is issued to bring the owner into court. In cases where evidence reveals extreme health and safety violations, a hearing officer will order the dwelling to be condemned as unfit for human habitation. If property owners can fix the issues and the building passes a new compliance inspection, habitation is allowed.