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Cornell Toolkit Lets High Schoolers Test Effects of Vaping on Living Cells

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The ASSET team has developed many other science modules for classrooms at all levels, including a module addressing the effects of cigarette smoke and alcohol on living cells. Credit: Provided The ASSET team has developed many other science modules for classrooms at all levels, including a module addressing the effects of cigarette smoke and alcohol on living cells. Credit: Provided

 

 

Cornell University launched a new, free resource for high school classrooms to test the effects of vaping on living cells.

The toolkit, developed through the College of Veterinary Medicine's science outreach program ASSET, contains small quantities of condensed e-cigarette vapor, unsmoked vape juice and vaporized water that has re-condensed in a clean e-cigarette.

The learning module has students apply the materials to a single-cell organism called a Tetrahymena.

The ASSET team created the program in response to the vaping epidemic among teens and adolescents.

In 2019, 28 percent of teens and 11 percent of middle schoolers reported using e-cigs in the past 30 days, according to a CDC survey.

On December 5, 2019, the CDC reported 48 deaths and 2,291 hospitalizations in the U.S. due to e-cigarettes and e-cigarette-related lung injuries.

The ASSET program is funded by the National Institutes of Health.