• Home


New Donors Needed to Fill Red Cross Missing Type Campaign

Posted: Updated:
JOHNSON CITY, N.Y. -

As part of an international movement, the American Red Cross is launching the Missing Types campaign to recruit new and existing donors to fill an urgent shortage of blood supply.

Monday, Johnson City's American Red Cross Center announced they will be illustrating the critical role every blood type plays, the letters A, B and O by erasing them from the logos and signs of everyday businesses and organizations. Because when these blood types are missing from the hospital shelves, everyone is impacted.

"Imagine a world without A, B, and O. Mom, dad, love; they lose their meanings...and that's what we want people to know at the American Red Cross," said Theresa Blank, Senior Account Manager American Red Cross.

Supporting the international movement, the Vandermark family stood alongside the Red Cross with their 4-year-old son Jackson, a heart surgery survivor.

"When you're sitting in the hospital bed next to your child and you see they need 7, 8, 9 different blood transfusions, it makes you think.
And you're thankful for the people that do stop by and donate," Jay Vandermark, Police Officer.

But during the summer months, when blood supply is at its lowest, it's up to the public to help families like the Vandermarks. Since roughly 20% of donors are students from high schools and colleges, the Red Cross is in desperate need.

"When your child is sick the last thing you want them to have is not be able to get the medicine that they need, and that's how we have to look at blood," said Theresa Blank.

According to the American Red Cross, every two seconds someone in the U.S. is in need of blood, yet only 3% of the U.S. population donates each year. So by working with social media, the R d Cr ss is hoping to get some 'new blood' in the clinics and give the gift of life to someone in need.

Hoping the next time you see a letter disappear before your eyes, you'll know what to do.


For a full list of Blood Drives in the Southern Tier, click here for more information.