• Home

Testimony in Cal Harris Trial Focuses on Divorce Details

Posted:
By Beth Rousseau.
Could a cut on Michele Harris' hand have caused the blood spatter found in the Harris home? This is the question jurors were left with when testimony concluded for the day in the trial of Cal Harris.

The town of Spencer man is charged with the death of his wife Michele who disappeared in September of 2001.

Tuesday Annette Thorne, a paralegal for Michele's deceased divorce attorney, told defense attorney Bruce Barket that Michele Harris did in fact have a cut on her hand at the end of March 2001.

Cal's defense team argues that it was this cut on her hand that caused the blood spatter found in the Harris garage and kitchen alcove area.

The cut is mentioned in divorce documents which also contain allegations that Michele received the cut when she was thrown to the ground by Cal during a dispute between the two.

Prosecutors now argue that affidavit signed by Michele containing this allegation should be allowed into evidence. Defense however objects calling it irrelevant.

Judge George Bartlett released jurors early today so that he could further research the matter and determine if that document will be allowed into evidence.

Jurors hear more about that blood spatter when NYSP Forensic Scientist Daniel Myers, who performed DNA testing on blood stains found on a rug in the Harris kitchen was once again called to the stand.

Myers says that DNA testing reveals that 4 stains on the rug are an exact DNA match to the toothbrush which Brian Earley previously testified belonged to Michele.

Myers adds that the probability of another individual having that same DNA profile is less than 1 in 300 billion.

Also today jurors learned more about the divorce proceedings between Cal and Michele.

Paralegal Thorne testified that Cal had offered Michele a divorce settlement of $740,000. Despite the settlement offer the pair still had a divorce trial scheduled for October of 2001.

Thorne will take the stand again Wednesday morning when testimony continues at 10 a-m.